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Paracord?


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#1 juicer5.56

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 05:20 PM

I am a hiker and a climber, a survivalist and also I work in a emergency tactical environment. I need a good supplier of topnotch paracord. I use it a ton but i have been getting what ever is cheapest. I need milspec if it is out there. Any thoughts on what is best and where to get it?

#2 LongHaul

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:03 PM

Juicer,

The ITS store sells milspec paracord. The price is competitive and by purchasing items in the ITS Store you help keep the website and forums running. There are other sources out there if you need very large quantities. Some sites carry 1000 ft. spools which may end up being slightly less costly per foot, but you have to buy $50 or more at a time and shipping gets expensive. I'd buy it from ITS because you know you're getting milspec product at a good price and you're helping fund the good work they do at ITS Tactical.

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#3 Lao

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:34 PM

+1 for the ITS store!! My box of awesome shipped today :)
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#4 LongHaul

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:50 PM

Yep, it's hard to beat the box of awesome! I've only gotten one so far. Hopefully I'll be seeing more of them. Is it a stamp or a stencil?

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#5 Lao

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:53 PM

Not sure, this will be my first official box of awesome!!! :)
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#6 j.k.chan24

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 11:19 PM

I've got plenty of boxes from the shop. I believe it's stamped on but I could be wrong.

The sweet thing about the ITS store paracord is that it comes in a vacuum sealed package. I have PACKAGES of them still; couple with my supplies, putting one or two in the car etc.

I bought a couple hundred feet from an eBay retailer and it just didn't seem the same.
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#7 juicer5.56

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:38 PM

Thanks for the input. I have scanned through the ITS store but I guess I missed the Paracord the first time. I will look again. I am definitely in favor of supporting ITS. I love this site and what these guys do!

#8 LongHaul

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:45 PM

juicer,

Here's the link to the paracord.

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#9 Slipery4life

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:49 AM

quick question i got some 550 cord and when i gut it it had 8 strands in the middle on was green with white and the rest white from what i can tell looks and feels reals just that extra strand is tripping me out anyone know about this

#10 berserkirtec

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:46 PM

As I understand, the 8 cord paracord breaks at approximately 650-700 lbs, not 550lbs. I hear it is great stuff.

#11 Davis

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 11:22 PM

Yes, it is still advertised as, and called 550 cord for military spec reasons, but actual pull testing shows that the 8 strand 550 cord fails at between 650 - 700 lbs of force.

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#12 assasinationday

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 08:06 AM

I am a hiker and a climber...


I'm a climber too. I've never seen anyone use paracord for a climbing application. What do you use for?

#13 TearsOfNorris

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 08:31 AM

Yes, it is still advertised as, and called 550 cord for military spec reasons, but actual pull testing shows that the 8 strand 550 cord fails at between 650 - 700 lbs of force.


I would guess that the 550lb rating is the lowest (safest) rating under all reasonable temperature conditions.

#14 Lao

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:14 AM

I'm a climber too. I've never seen anyone use paracord for a climbing application. What do you use for?


In the Military it's used for all sorts of things, from Survival to Rigging airdrop loads. It has tons of uses... worth the investment, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors / camping / hiking.
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#15 assasinationday

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:48 PM

I love paracord. I have hundreds of feet of the stuff at home and use it for a million different things.

But for climbing? No way. And for someone to mention they use it for climbing immediately draws suspicion.

Paracord is rated to 550 pounds. Someone in this thread claims that 550 paracord failed between 650-700 pounds in a pull test. Ok, let’s go with that.

So, let’s look at climbing cord vs. paracord. FYI - kN (kilonewton) is about 225 of fall force.

For anchoring purposes, the lightest nylon cordage most climbers use is 7mm accessory cord. My 7mm cord is rated to 2,788 pounds (14 kN). Something thinner/lighter than 7mm, such as 6mm Technora is rated to 4,271 pounds (19 kN) and is generally used for alpine environments since it’s lighter and works better when wet or frozen than nylon.

Now, that’s not to say you can’t use weaker cordage for other applications. For example, a prusik which is a rappel back up and not a life-safety line, is often made from 5mm cord. But even 5mm cord is rated to 1,169 pounds (5 kN). Would I use 550 paracord even in this situation? No. And I’ve never come across a climber who has either.

I’ve been climbing for years on a regular basis. I’m well-schooled in climbing facts, data, and studies. Someone telling me they use paracord for climbing is like someone telling a Sniper they use a .22 to hit targets 1000 yards down range in the desert. Yeah, it’s a gun (or in the case, a cord), and yeah it shoots (or in this case, can bear a load), but no way it’s going to work.

And during my time in the Army, I've never seen paracord used for climbing, rappelling, air assualt, etc.

#16 LongHaul

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:08 PM

Hmm. I guess I didn't take juicer to mean that he was using the 550 cord for climbing purposes. I thought he was just providing a little background to say that he was into outdoors activities. You make some excellent points and I would also say that 550 cord has many uses and is excellent stuff, however it should never be used for climbing or anchors! YIKES... O_O

For additional info on accessory cord for climbing use I highly recommend Tom Moyers excellent paper "Comparative Testing of High Strength Cord" presented at the 2000 International Technical Rescue Symposium.

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#17 assasinationday

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:47 PM

Another thing to consider with paracord is it’s resistance to abrasion. 10mm nylon climbing ropes can quickly be sawed in half when weighted and rubbing against a sharp cliff edge. That’s why EXTENSION is one of the main principles of climbing safety. And given paracord’s diameter (3mm-5mm?) there’s not much surface area or material and when you factor in a body-weight load even a small nick would likely compromise the material.

As far as rappelling with paracord...that’s a risky proposition. In theory, 550 pounds is adequate to support a rappel given that the force is only supposed to be the static-pull of the rappeller’s body weight. If fully extended (meaning the weighted sections of cord have no contact with any surfaces) and there were no knots tied it MIGHT just be safe using a device rated to the cord’s diameter (maybe a figure-8 device?). Personally, I would cry like a two-year old baby if I had to rappel using paracord.

#18 TearsOfNorris

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:43 PM

In addition to paracord, I like to carry at least 20' of 100lb spectra fishing line and a needle in my wallet. Most sporting goods places carry it, and it is invaluable for times when you want small cordage and don't want to disassemble your 550 for the core (the spectra is thinner than the inner 550 strands).

#19 wakenhord

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:59 AM


The information produced is worthy. I had not experienced with this company yet but came to know through one of my friends that worthy and is satisfied with this. I was familiar with some of the interiors and belts made of the Paracords.







550 paracord
wholesale paracord


#20 andrewbisgnar

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:40 AM

I know that this might not apply to everyone, but my base exchange(NEX) always has awesome deals on cordage. I buy Rothco coyote milspec in 500FT reels for about 12 dollars. Which seems to beat even Amazon's prices. Also, if you know any PRs(Navy parachute repairman) or aircrew of any type they can usually get HUGE hookups for cordage. The color is usually coyote or black from my friends.

-Andrew




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