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What's on your Bucket List?


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#1 OhioGuy

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 05:59 AM

As we grow older some of us ponder the years we have left, or the years we have the "ability" to do certain things.

What are some things you would like to do before you leave this earth?

Here are a few of mine:

1. Parachute from a plane.
2. Bungee jump from a tall bridge.
3. Zip Line through a forest.
4. Visit Italy, Ireland, Jamaica and more.
5. Own a Jeep or SUV that has been all tricked out for off road use.
6. Get back into shape and lose weight.

I will add to list when I have more time... :cool:

#2 DStevenson

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:04 PM

Nice thread idea.

I will be nailing a couple down this coming year, and assuming there are no big curve balls they are all ready to go.

Something that I've added to my bucket list several years ago was to attend a Chris Costa class, that will be happening this coming year in April and I'm stoked.
Here is my list in no particular order.

1. Watch my children grow to adulthood, get married and see my grand children (something my father couldn't do because of a heart attack... of all things, I don't want to miss this opportunity)
2. Chris Costa Carbine Employement class - Scheduled in April.
3. Complete my private pilots license
4. Upgrade my BMW to an new M3 at some point.
5. Complete an advanced collegiate degree - Working on it now.
6. Grow my personal business to 5 or more employees (quite an accomplishment for my business)
7. Take a reddot sight and hit a target 750 meters (1/2 mile) away, just to say I can. See the video at the bottom.
8. Play goalie in a pro-am hockey tournament.
9. Run a marathon with some new knees. Blew out my knees in the military and need surgery on them but once they(not me... my knees) are ready they(my knees) are being entered into a marathon or a tri-athalon.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgKjbySsAik 7m20s.

Edited by DStevenson, 12 December 2012 - 12:05 PM.

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#3 OhioGuy

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 05:48 PM

Apparently I you can't edit a post after some time has gone by but I agree with one of yours which is see my kids have kids, which my dad also never saw mine due to an accident that took his life way too early. At least my mother got to see my kids for many years until she passed.

#4 H46USNAC

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 07:13 PM

Can't really say I have a "bucket list"

Been to all 50 states. ( parents, U.S. Navy and a stint at over the road truck driving made that happen )

Saw enough of the world to make me happy, courtesy of the U.S. Navy

But, I've always wanted to skydive. I used to watch my dad jump when I was a kid and never got a chance.
My 50th birthday is coming up, and my wife decided to pony up the money for me to go jump.
Not some tandem jump mind you, but an actual freefall and land my own parachute jump. My life in my own hands
Well, last week we drove two hours to the jump facility. She sat around waiting for me to sit through a 4-6 hour class and then NOT get to jump due to weather. Never any complaint on her part.
We went back yesterday and I got to do my first jump.

IT WAS AWSOME! Jumped from 14,000 feet with two instructors, neither one attached to me by anything other than their hands.
They observed that I was performing the tasks that I needed to do and when I deployed my chute; they fell away to deploy their own chutes.
From that point I was on my own to evaluate my chute and determine if I needed to dump it and got to my reserve. Then I had to pilot the chute back to the landing area and land it.

It was an incredible experience that fulfilled something she knew I had always wanted to do but had put off because there were always more important things that needed to be done.

I will be forever grateful to her for making that happen.

Attached is a picture of me coming in for my landing.Attached File  image.jpg   90.37KB   7 downloads
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#5 H46USNAC

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:41 PM

Update, went today and did my fourth and fifth Accelerated Free Fall jumps. On the fifth jump, the instructor asked me if I wanted to do a solo exit. BOOYAH!, did the entire jump completely unassisted ( solo exit, 360° left and right turns, forward movement, solo deployment ).
Cleared to move on to my sixth jump!

Thanks wife!
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#6 Davis

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:27 PM

H46USNAC: Just curious, where it is that you found this accelerated program? I would be interested in looking it up.

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#7 H46USNAC

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:14 AM

H46USNAC: Just curious, where it is that you found this accelerated program? I would be interested in looking it up.


davis.agd,

The short answer to your question is Cedartown, GA at a place called Skydive The Farm.

I found a website for you that has a database of DZ's ( drop zones )
Go here and click on your state. It will pull up a list of DZ's and there is a column that list the courses that each DZ offers
( Tandem, AFF or Static )

I chose AFF because I wanted to know, if I only did this once in my life, that I had made the choice to jump from that plane and controlled the parachute to return me to the ground. If I was going to do it, it was going to be with full commitment. Something I think many people can't relate to but most of the folks that frequent the ITS website and forum can relate to.

http://www.dropzone..../United_States/

Be sure to read the reviews.


------------------------------------------------ LONGER ANSWER BELOW ----------------------------------------------------

TANDEM - requires very little training, about 15 minutes brief with your instructor, and you jump from the plane physically attached to your instructor, with the instructor in control of the free fall, opening the chute and piloting it back to the ground. More of an option for the weekend thrill seeker not really wanting to learn skydiving or the potential skydiver who wants to try it without taking as much responsibility for their own life..

STATIC - is just like you think of military style jumps. No free fall time. When you jump from the plane, there is a line attached to the plane that deploys your parachute for you. Probably the least risky and most boring of options in my opinion.

AFF ( accelerated free fall ) - requires the most commitment. You will sit through a 4-6 hour class prior to making your first jump in which you'll learn the basics of skydiving, hand signals used, emergency procedures, etc...
You'll jump with 2 instructors. They will be holding on to your jumpsuit or parachute harness with their hands but will not be permanently attached to you as with Tandem jumping, so there is the risk of getting separated for them and being completely on your own. The instructors are there to help you stay stable and observe you during the free fall to assess your actions during the jump, to be certain you have not frozen up with fear and if necessary to deploy your chute for you if you are unable to do it for yourself. Once the chute is deployed it is entirely up to you to pilot the chute back to the DZ and land it. The instructors will have a radio and will radio guidance to you, but you are the one that has to make it happen.
With each jump in the AFF program, you are given a little more freedom from the instructors "holding" on to you or your harness and you have to demonstrate increasing confidence in free fall and more skills during each free fall. By the fourth jump, you will only have one instructor jumping with you. The instructor will release you completely and you will execute 90° turns and forward movement.
Each jump is critiqued and you are either cleared to move on to the next level or you may have to repeat that jump. If all goes well, your seventh jump is your "graduation" jump where you will be evaluated on whether you will be cleared to make completely solo jumps.
Pass your seventh jump and you are able to jump with no instructor(s) with you. You are still considered a student, with other skills to learn and demonstrate. 25 jumps are required to get your "A" license, with other licenses to aquire and skills to continue learning after that.

I live in the Atlanta, GA area and the first DZ ( drop zone ) that I tried turned out to not be such a great place. Out of four trips to the first location, I was able to get 1 jump in. It's a 1-1/2 hour drive to get to the DZ. so that's a total of 12 hours of driving and hours of waiting around to only get in 1 jump.

Contrast that with the second DZ that I went to. On the same day as the last trip to the first location and only 3 miles away, I was able to get in 2 jumps. Then yesterday, two more jumps and could have jumped a third time. During my first jump yesterday the wife called over to the first place, only 3 miles away, and was told that they were done jumping for the day because the weather had closed in. We were 3 miles away and, I say this as a former Navy helicopter crewchief, the weather was NOT bad.
After the first jump, at the first place, I read many online reviews that indicated that the first place we had chosen seems to shut down at the drop of a hat. I do understand erring on the side of caution, but it does seem that the first place doesn't seem as interested in skydiving. So that works out to 4 jumps in two trips of driving over to the second place. 6 hours driving for 4 jumps vs 12 hours driving for 1 jump.

Should have checked those online reviews first.

One other bit of info that you might find helpful. The old military term of "Hurry up and wait" sure seems to apply in the skydiving community. Don't be surprised at long periods of waiting for the weather conditions to be "right" or if you go for the AFF option for people who arrive after you to go jump before you because they want to evaluate the winds aloft to determine suitability for your to jump.
Maybe out in AZ, it will be a bit different due to different weather patterns. Just know that for military or LEO minded folks who are used being everywhere 15-30 minutes early and when given a start time, expect for things to be happening, the skydiving community can be a little bit "different" than how our minds work. Bring a book, an iPad/iPhone with games etc... and settle in and just plan on making a full day of it.

Let me know what you think of it if you do go jump.

Edited by H46USNAC, 20 January 2013 - 11:18 PM.

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#8 H46USNAC

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:14 PM

Update on the skydiving.

Yesterday was absolutely gorgeous here in the Atlanta area.
Went to the DZ yesterday and was able to get in 3 jumps. ( passed my 6th & 7th AFF jumps and did my first solo jump )
Too freakin' cool.

Also got some more stuff signed off toward my "A" license by one of the instructors.
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#9 iExpresso

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:24 PM

Absolutely jealous!
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#10 H46USNAC

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:39 PM

I had to do it...

Attached File  image.jpg   327.85KB   6 downloads

This is my skydiving helmet.
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#11 DStevenson

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:52 AM

That helmet is pretty bad ass looking.
Just a question and I'm not trying to be a jerk but does weight really play a role when your falling?

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#12 H46USNAC

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 06:25 PM

That helmet is pretty bad ass looking.
Just a question and I'm not trying to be a jerk but does weight really play a role when your falling?


Wow!, what a toad. I can't believe you even asked that! My fragile feelings are so hurt right now.

But seriously, I don't see how asking that would make you a jerk. It's a legitimate question.

Yes, weight is a factor when you are falling and while you are under canopy.

When two people, of different weights are falling together, technique aside, they will fall at slightly different rates. There are different body positions that can be assumed that can compensate for slightly different fall rates so that the two will stay together.
The human body generally falls between 120 - 125 mph in freefall. There are positions that can make that speed even faster.

Needless to say, I'm going on a strict diet so I can get my freefall speed closer to 120 mph. That way when everything fails and I crash into Mother Earth; that 5 mph reduction in speed might just save my sorry hide. Pfffft, yeah right!

I weigh about 230lbs and one of the instructors that I jumped with had to wear a weight belt so he and I would fall closer to the same rate ( It was kinda important for him to stick with the FNG until said FNG proved himself worthy of being left unsupervised while hurtling toward the ground at 125 mph ).

Weight also comes into play while your canopy is deployed. There is something called "wing loading" that affects how the same parachute will perform with people of different weights.

Wing Loading is your exit weight ( your weight + the weight of all gear you have on, including the parachute ) divided by the square footage of the canopy you are using.

For inexperienced jumpers, such as myself, they try to keep the wing loading to around 0.8.

Edited by H46USNAC, 24 January 2013 - 06:29 PM.

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#13 spenceman

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

1.) Not Die.

For the win!
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#14 H46USNAC

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 08:29 AM

Another skydiving update.

Woohoo!, found a complete parachute rig for sale in Canada. The owner shipped it to my DZ so I could have it inspected prior to purchase. It's a little bit smaller canopy than I've been flying, so I'll have to get used to it flying faster and some other characteristics of it so I don't end up breaking myself, but not so much smaller that it's ridiculously dangerous.
The rigger gave it a thumbs up and told me he was really impressed with the condition everything was in. So I went ahead and made the purchase.
Last weekend, I got my "A" license signed off and was able to make my first jump as a licensed skydiver my first jump on my own rig.
A man who wants to do something will find a way; a man who doesn't will find an excuse.

#15 Klarktx

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 12:35 PM

Obtain my pilots license

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#16 mangeface

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 06:50 PM

Good thread worth reviving.

1) Get married and have kids (not uh...working out so well on the spouse search)

2) Take a ride in a Su-27 or MiG-29.

3) Start my own aircraft maintenance company.

4) Own a large plot of land with a nice self sustaining house.

5) Climb the Seven Summits: http://en.m.wikipedi...i/Seven_Summits

6) Travel to the North and South Poles.

Eh, the list will grow, but these are things I want to accomplish before I'm 45 (I'm 25 now).
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#17 Boanerges

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 07:41 AM

Kill at least a dozen more commies!!!!




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